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Love your legumes: our top 10 recipes

Love your legumes: our top 10 recipes

Legume is a broad term that refers to beans and pulses. Lentils, black beans, kidney beans, butter beans, chickpeas and even peanuts are all part of the legume family.

Beans and pulses are widely available in tins and jars but it’s easy to swap them for the dried varieties. They need a bit more love, but have more flavour and texture than tinned and are often cheaper too! As a general rule, cooking will double the weight of dried beans and pulses, so for example, if a recipe calls for a tin of chickpeas (240g drained weight) you can swap this for 120g of dried chickpeas. Always check the label before you start as the cooking and soaking times and the resulting weight may vary.

What’s great about legumes?

Different legumes have different nutrients but all pulses and beans are a source of protein and fibre. Protein is good for our bones and muscles, and fibre helps maintain a healthy digestive system. In particular, black beans are a source of iron, which help us make red blood cells (just remember to have them with vitamin C-rich foods, such as peppers, to increase the absorption). Lentils are a source of copper and chickpeas a source of manganese, both which we need to help protect our cells from damage among other important things.

Beans are really versatile and a great plant-based protein source. A single serving of beans is roughly three heaped tablespoons, or 80g, which counts as one portion of your 5-a-day (note you can only count beans or pulses once towards your 5-a-day).

10 lovely ideas for legumes

Check out more ways with our favourite legumes here.


6 Homemade Dog Food Recipes That Are Good Enough for Humans

We humans don’t deserve all the fun. While we stress about how to make dinner interesting, our furry friends often get treated to the same ol’ meal, day in and day out. We can only imagine how boring that must be.

Why not actually treat them to something — as in, something homemade? These DIY dog food recipes are simple, cheap, and sure to make your pup love you…even more than they already do.

If you’re into formulas to make life easier (yes, please), most of the dog food recipes break down like this:

  • 50 percent cooked protein
  • 25 percent produce
  • 25 percent cooked complex carbs

Here are some general guidelines for how much chow you’ll need, depending on the weight of your dog. Keep in mind, you may need to cook more if your pooch is super active.

Dog weightFood per day
12 pounds1 cup
25 pounds2 cups
50 pounds4 cups
100 pounds8 cups

Before you dive into the doggie delicacies below, check in with your vet about what your four-legged friend really needs.

Each breed has different nutritional requirements to consider. Plus, many purebreds, like Frenchies and pugs, are known to be more prone to food allergies. Always work with a pup professional you trust.

It’s also a good idea to transition dogs slowly when introducing a new diet. Though they’ll beg you otherwise with those big, beautiful eyes, only give them a little new food at a time to prevent stomach upset.

Feed Your Best Friend Better is an amazing resource for those looking to mix it up in the kitchen and give their bestie all the nutrients, vitamins, and minerals they require. Hint: it’s a lot.

1. DIY homemade dog food

While dogs and humans enjoy some of the same foods (peanut butter straight out of the jar, comes to mind), what we need to stay healthy and fit is different.

This recipe has a balance of 50 percent protein with ground turkey and peas, 25 percent veggies with spinach, carrots, and zucchini, and 25 percent grains with brown rice, but it can be easily adjusted for any dog’s nutritional needs.

Here’s the best part: Making this batch of food is cheaper than buying many popular all-natural store-bought varieties.

2. Healthy homemade dog food

We talk a lot about food allergies… but dog food allergies? Yep, it’s a thing.

It could be super obvious, like smelly omg-what-did-you-eat farts or little piles of vomit on the floor. It could also be less obvious, like your doggo licking the area around their joints, a sign of inflammation.

If you suspect your dog has a sensitive stomach, call your vet to make an appointment and then try this recipe. This meal uses pumpkin purée, coconut oil, ground protein, grains, and a slew of colorful produce to create a feast that even finicky dogs can stomach.

It smells so darn good when it’s cooking, we’ve been tempted to eat it ourselves. (OK… we might’ve tried it.)

3. Homemade dog food

Making homemade dog food may not be realistic to incorporate into your everyday routine, but that doesn’t mean your furry friend can’t benefit from a little DIY here and there.

In fact, this blogger only incorporates homemade meals about twice per week — better than never, right? The recipe includes many DIY dog food staples, like protein, grains, apples, and carrots.

This dish also throws in some blueberries, a known heart-healthy treat for humans, thanks to their rich polyphenol content. Rodriguez-Mateos A, et al. (2014). Berry (poly)phenols and cardiovascular health. DOI: 10.1021/jf403757g

Turns out, the protective effects of berries against free radical damage may have a similar impact on dogs with heart failure, though more research is needed. Sagols E, et al. (2010). Oxidative stress in dog with heart failure: The role of dietary fatty acids and antioxidants. DOI: 10.4061/2011/180206

4. Easy Crock Pot dog food

When using a slow cooker, it’s important to use sturdy veggies that stand up to the heat and extra-long cook time.

This recipe sticks to the classics like brown rice, beans, ground beef, squash, carrots, and frozen peas. The dense ingredients ensure that the food freezes well, so you don’t always have to cook it from scratch (glory hallelujah).

5. DIY homemade dog food with chicken

If you think about a dog’s closest modern relative, the grey wolf, Pendelton AL, et al. (2017). Comparison of village dog and wolf genomes highlights the role of the neural crest in dog domestication. DOI: 10.1186/s12915-018-0535-2 it makes sense that a canine’s diet should incorporate at least some produce — perhaps a few greens in the belly of whatever omnivorous animal the wolf hunted down (sorry, little guy).

To that end, this recipe includes some of the other ingredients you’ve seen already, plus a few cups of spinach. Dogs don’t need much in each serving — a little greenery goes a long way.

Pro tip: You can also sub in ground turkey for this recipe.

6. Easy homemade dog food Crock Pot recipe with ground chicken

Chicken, kidney beans, butternut squash, and green beans served over a bed of white rice? Not only is this recipe super simple to make, this is basically a regular stay-at-home dinner for humans. Why not?

Chicken livers also work great in this recipe, though we understand if you are now less keen to take a bite. Make extra servings so you can store plenty of leftovers in the freezer.

If your dog seems less-than-enthusiastic about the nightly ritual of dried kibble — we all know that look — then why not put your cooking skills to good use? It’s just one of the many ways we can show appreciation for our best bud.

With a generous helping of protein, fresh produce, and hearty grains, these recipes will get that tail wagging again. Don’t be surprised when that bowl is licked clean.

Hilary I. Lebow is a health journalist with fitness and nutrition certifications through the Yoga Alliance and the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM). When she’s not working, you’ll find her playing on the beach with her two dogs or exploring around Miami, the beautiful city she calls home. Read more of her work here.


How to Cook Black Beans

My method for how to cook black beans from scratch is slightly different from my approach to cooking other types of beans. Because I often use them in black bean recipes like tacos and enchiladas, I want them to hold their shape. As a result, I don’t soak the beans before I cook them. I also find that not soaking creates a richer, creamier cooking liquid, which makes the beans an especially delicious side dish. So, I skip the soak, and follow these easy steps:

  • First, sort and rinse the beans. Add them to a colander and discard any stones or debris. Rinse them well, and place them in a large pot.
  • Then, add the water and seasonings. Because I like black beans to have a thick, flavorful cooking liquid, I always measure the water when I cook them. I start with 4 cups of water for every cup of beans, and I add more as needed to keep the beans submerged as they cook. After I pour in the water, I stir in cumin, olive oil, salt, and pepper and bring the pot to a boil.
  • Once the water is boiling, reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook, uncovered, until the black beans are tender. I start checking mine at 1 hour and then again every 15 minutes after that. Depending on the freshness of your beans, it could take up to 2.5 hours. Right before the beans are ready, stir some garlic into the pot.
  • Finally, season to taste. Taste the beans and season them with more salt and pepper. Then, have fun spicing them up however you like! They taste great with chili powder, Mexican oregano, lime juice and zest, and/or chopped cilantro. Enjoy!

Find the complete recipe with measurements below.


2 of 5

Black Beans

Benefits: Vitamin B1, protein*, iron, folate, copper, magnesium, manganese, potassium, zinc

What to look for when buying black beans: Canned beans have the same amount of nutrients as dried but are higher in sodium. Look for canned beans with no added salt, and drain and rinse the beans.

Storing: Keep dried beans inside an airtight container in a dry place for 6-12 months. Cooked beans can be covered and chilled for up to 5 days or frozen for up to 3 months.

Usage: To prepare dry beans, soak in cold water overnight. Drain and add more water. Simmer covered for 1 to 1-1¿2 hours.

*Using beans as a protein source helps reduce the amount of saturated fat consumed from animal proteins.


My 10 favorite Dinner in Minutes recipes of 2020 include étouffée, Instant Pot stew and chicken, chicken, chicken

I was wowed by that greeting, and in the next beat a bit intimidated. I was joining a stellar team and stepping into big shoes, so I focused on the end-game: Sharing recipes — online and in the newspaper — that would spring to mind when we find ourselves wondering: What am I going to cook tonight?

To do that, for Dinner in Minutes, I drew from old favorites that I’ve made again and again (shrimp étouffée, anyone?) and new ones that I learned about from readers, colleagues and terrific cookbooks.

Each week, a few days after I hit publish, I’d get a little thrill when readers write to tell me a dish is now in the “clean plate club!” or when they report back: “The recipe is clear and easy to follow, I had a bit of trepidation, but it all turned out really well.”

As I look back on this tumultuous year, I found it tough to pick favorites. So, here, in alphabetical order because I just can’t play favorites among my favorites, are my top 10 Dinner in Minutes recipes of the year.

Hope you will try or, better yet, re-try them in the coming year.

Akoho Misy Sakamalao. Sometimes the simplest dishes have a surprisingly big flavor. This five-ingredient, one-skillet chicken dish from “In Bibi’s Kitchen” by Hawa Hassan with Julia Turshen shows the power of combining coconut oil with lots of garlic and ginger to turn forgiving chicken thighs into a memorable meal in minutes.

Bacon-Stuffed Shrimp Burgers. This one comes from my own stash of favorite recipes. I love bacon-wrapped shrimp, and this dish is the next best thing. You tuck crispy bacon bits inside a ground shrimp burger, then pan-fry the burger and serve it on a crispy bun.

Baked Chicken Nuggets With Warm Potato Salad. When I’m craving a picnic — even an indoor picnic — I turn to this dish. The chicken nuggets are a fine alternative to fried, but what I keep coming back to is the tahini-dressed potato salad. Whisk together the olive oil, tahini, lemon juice and pepper and then stir in a bit of chopped parsley and toss that with the warm potatoes until coated. Add a sprinkle of scallions if you like. So simple. So good.

Beef and Broccoli Stir-Fry. The combination of beef and broccoli is a longtime favorite of mine, and this version nails it. The addition of the scallions, ginger and garlic right at the end gives it a bright burst of flavor. I adapted it from Eating Well, which does a great job of taking favorite dishes and making them just a bit healthier without sacrificing flavor. It’s not always easy, but this is a great example of that effort.

Coconut Rice With Salmon and Cilantro Sauce. Our team is a hotbed of recipe sharing, as you can imagine. When I first started, Olga Massov handed me “The Kitchen Shelf” by Rosie Reynolds and Eve O’Sullivan, with a sticky note on this recipe. It is a dish she makes again and again. I found out why when I tasted the salmon served over the creamy rice made with coconut milk and topped with spicy-sweet cilantro sauce whirred in a food processor.

Instant Pot Beef Stew. For this stew, I pretended I was on one of those timed cooking shows and worked hard to bring it to the table in 45 minutes. To do that, I relied on baby carrots and potatoes, frozen pearl onions and pre-cut beef and, of course, my trusty Instant Pot. I made it under the wire, and it truly does taste like it has simmered on the stove for hours.

Mosca’s Chicken a la Grande. Garlic lovers unite around this one-skillet, big-flavored chicken recipe from Mary Jo Mosca of Mosca’s Restaurant on U.S. 90 in a little town outside New Orleans. There, the dish is served family-style. I like to move the chicken to a platter, tent it to keep it warm and then blister some green beans in the garlicky skillet to go with the chicken.

Pork Chops and Cabbage With Mustard Cream Sauce. I’ll admit that I was surprised by the popularity of this recipe with readers. I loved it, but I didn’t expect the kudos received for this dish from Urvashi Pitre’s “Easy Keto in 30 Minutes.” The dish calls to mind German food, with the mustard cutting the richness of the cream with a little tang. Great for a chilly night.

Shrimp Étouffée. This was one of the first dishes I made once I settled in Washington. I like to fill a new home with familiar scents from the kitchen as a way of christening my new surroundings. Everyone interprets étouffée their own way, but this recipe is a quick and easy way to dip your toe into the Cajun canon. In January, I wrote: “As the new Dinner in Minutes columnist, I know I must earn your trust. I hope this étouffée gets us off on the right forkful.” I hope it did.

Souvlaki-Style Chicken With Tangy Yogurt Dip. I love to create platters for dinner. It makes a meal feel more festive – all those flavors and textures. I learned to make this tzatziki, a dill-flavored yogurt dip, from Ginny Zissis, director of the New Orleans annual Greek Festival. It’s great anytime, but I love it served with oregano and lemon-flavored chicken skewers, fresh tomatoes and onions and warm pita. It’s a light meal that’s fun to eat together.

Did you make any of these recipes? Take a photo and tag us on Instagram with #eatvoraciously.


My 10 favorite Dinner in Minutes recipes of 2020 include étouffée, Instant Pot stew and chicken, chicken, chicken

I was wowed by that greeting, and in the next beat a bit intimidated. I was joining a stellar team and stepping into big shoes, so I focused on the end-game: Sharing recipes — online and in the newspaper — that would spring to mind when we find ourselves wondering: What am I going to cook tonight?

To do that, for Dinner in Minutes, I drew from old favorites that I’ve made again and again (shrimp étouffée, anyone?) and new ones that I learned about from readers, colleagues and terrific cookbooks.

Each week, a few days after I hit publish, I’d get a little thrill when readers write to tell me a dish is now in the “clean plate club!” or when they report back: “The recipe is clear and easy to follow, I had a bit of trepidation, but it all turned out really well.”

As I look back on this tumultuous year, I found it tough to pick favorites. So, here, in alphabetical order because I just can’t play favorites among my favorites, are my top 10 Dinner in Minutes recipes of the year.

Hope you will try or, better yet, re-try them in the coming year.

Akoho Misy Sakamalao. Sometimes the simplest dishes have a surprisingly big flavor. This five-ingredient, one-skillet chicken dish from “In Bibi’s Kitchen” by Hawa Hassan with Julia Turshen shows the power of combining coconut oil with lots of garlic and ginger to turn forgiving chicken thighs into a memorable meal in minutes.

Bacon-Stuffed Shrimp Burgers. This one comes from my own stash of favorite recipes. I love bacon-wrapped shrimp, and this dish is the next best thing. You tuck crispy bacon bits inside a ground shrimp burger, then pan-fry the burger and serve it on a crispy bun.

Baked Chicken Nuggets With Warm Potato Salad. When I’m craving a picnic — even an indoor picnic — I turn to this dish. The chicken nuggets are a fine alternative to fried, but what I keep coming back to is the tahini-dressed potato salad. Whisk together the olive oil, tahini, lemon juice and pepper and then stir in a bit of chopped parsley and toss that with the warm potatoes until coated. Add a sprinkle of scallions if you like. So simple. So good.

Beef and Broccoli Stir-Fry. The combination of beef and broccoli is a longtime favorite of mine, and this version nails it. The addition of the scallions, ginger and garlic right at the end gives it a bright burst of flavor. I adapted it from Eating Well, which does a great job of taking favorite dishes and making them just a bit healthier without sacrificing flavor. It’s not always easy, but this is a great example of that effort.

Coconut Rice With Salmon and Cilantro Sauce. Our team is a hotbed of recipe sharing, as you can imagine. When I first started, Olga Massov handed me “The Kitchen Shelf” by Rosie Reynolds and Eve O’Sullivan, with a sticky note on this recipe. It is a dish she makes again and again. I found out why when I tasted the salmon served over the creamy rice made with coconut milk and topped with spicy-sweet cilantro sauce whirred in a food processor.

Instant Pot Beef Stew. For this stew, I pretended I was on one of those timed cooking shows and worked hard to bring it to the table in 45 minutes. To do that, I relied on baby carrots and potatoes, frozen pearl onions and pre-cut beef and, of course, my trusty Instant Pot. I made it under the wire, and it truly does taste like it has simmered on the stove for hours.

Mosca’s Chicken a la Grande. Garlic lovers unite around this one-skillet, big-flavored chicken recipe from Mary Jo Mosca of Mosca’s Restaurant on U.S. 90 in a little town outside New Orleans. There, the dish is served family-style. I like to move the chicken to a platter, tent it to keep it warm and then blister some green beans in the garlicky skillet to go with the chicken.

Pork Chops and Cabbage With Mustard Cream Sauce. I’ll admit that I was surprised by the popularity of this recipe with readers. I loved it, but I didn’t expect the kudos received for this dish from Urvashi Pitre’s “Easy Keto in 30 Minutes.” The dish calls to mind German food, with the mustard cutting the richness of the cream with a little tang. Great for a chilly night.

Shrimp Étouffée. This was one of the first dishes I made once I settled in Washington. I like to fill a new home with familiar scents from the kitchen as a way of christening my new surroundings. Everyone interprets étouffée their own way, but this recipe is a quick and easy way to dip your toe into the Cajun canon. In January, I wrote: “As the new Dinner in Minutes columnist, I know I must earn your trust. I hope this étouffée gets us off on the right forkful.” I hope it did.

Souvlaki-Style Chicken With Tangy Yogurt Dip. I love to create platters for dinner. It makes a meal feel more festive – all those flavors and textures. I learned to make this tzatziki, a dill-flavored yogurt dip, from Ginny Zissis, director of the New Orleans annual Greek Festival. It’s great anytime, but I love it served with oregano and lemon-flavored chicken skewers, fresh tomatoes and onions and warm pita. It’s a light meal that’s fun to eat together.

Did you make any of these recipes? Take a photo and tag us on Instagram with #eatvoraciously.


How to Cook Dried Beans 4 Ways

Canned beans are THE pantry staple to stock up on because they&aposre cheap, nutritious, versatile, and shelf-stable. While canned beans are convenient, they can lose quality in the canning process and don&apost have the flavor and texture of dried beans you cook from scratch.

You can use cooked dried beans in a variety of dishes, from chili to bean salad to soup. Plus, dried beans have a shelf life of up to two years, so you&aposre not likely to run out anytime soon.

Learn how to cook dried beans four ways: on the stove, in a slow cooker, in the Instant Pot, and in a stovetop pressure cooker.

How to Cook Dried Beans on the Stove

Undoubtedly the most popular method, cooking dried beans on the stove doesn&apost require any fancy gadgets or appliances. On the downside, it requires some planning, as you&aposll have to soak dried beans before cooking them for best results. Here&aposs how you do it, step-by-step:

1. Sort the Beans

Bags of dried beans often have debris, shriveled, or broken beans mixed in with the rest. That&aposs why it&aposs important to first sort your beans. While quickly running your fingers through the beans might sound like a shortcut, trust us, it&aposs not worth the risk of having a twig in your beans.

To sort your beans, start by arranging dried beans on a sheet pan or clean kitchen towel. Remove and discard any shriveled or broken beans, and any debris.

2. Wash the Beans

Place beans in a colander or strainer and rinse them under cold running water to wash away any dirt or dust.

3. Soak the Beans

Now here&aposs the part that everyone hates to hear: You need to soak the beans before cooking them on the stove. (Let&aposs just take a moment and collectively sigh about it.) But soaking your beans helps them cook faster and more evenly. And the good news is, you can get a similar effect with quick soaking methods. Here&aposs how to soak your beans two ways: overnight soak or short soak.

  • Overnight Soak for Beans: Soaking your beans overnight is the most traditional method, and it yields the best results. It allows you to cook beans on the stove quickly without sacrificing flavor or texture. To soak beans overnight, put the beans in a pot and cover with water by about two inches. Add 2 tablespoons kosher salt per pound of beans and allow them to soak for 4 to 12 hours, or overnight. Drain and rinse the beans before cooking.
  • Short Soak for Beans: If you didn&apost plan ahead to soak your beans overnight, don&apost fret. You can still get similar results using this quick soak method. To start, put the beans in a pot on the stove and cover with water by two inches. Add salt and bring to a boil. Turn off the heat and let the beans soak for an hour. Drain and rinse the beans before cooking.

4. Cook the Beans

Now we&aposre finally getting to the good part: how to cook your beans on the stove top. Start by placing your beans in a pot. Cover them with at least two inches of water. Now is the time to add any salt or aromatics to the water. Turn the heat to low and cover, stirring the beans occasionally. Never let your beans reach a roiling boil. Cooking time depends on the type of bean: Most pre-soaked beans will take between 45 minutes and 2 hours to cook. Periodically taste the beans or mash them against the side of the pot to test for doneness.

How to Cook Dried Beans in a Slow Cooker

Soaking the beans is not required when using a slow cooker, but it can help to reduce the cooking time in a slow cooker. If you can remember it, go ahead and soak your beans the night before. But if you forgot, no big deal! That&aposs the beauty of a slow cooker. Here&aposs how to cook your beans in a slow cooker, step-by-step:

1. Sort and Wash the Beans

Refer to instructions for the stovetop cooking method for more details.

2. Soak the Beans or Don&apost

If you do choose to soak your beans, refer to the instructions for the stovetop cooking method for more details.

3. Cook the Beans

Toss your beans into the slow cooker and cover with two inches of water or broth. Add any seasonings or aromatics (including salt). Set your slow cooker to the low setting, and cook until beans are done. This is going to vary based on the type of bean, and whether or not they are pre-soaked. Cook pre-soaked beans for 3 to 4 hours, and un-soaked beans for 5 to 6 hours. Test for doneness periodically by either tasting or mashing against the side of the pot.

How to Cook Dried Beans in the Instant Pot

When it comes to cooking beans in an Instant Pot or any other electric pressure cooker, soaking goes out the window! So if you&aposve got one, there&aposs no quicker way to cook dried beans. Skip the soaking step, and follow the remainder of these steps for Instant Pot beans:

1. Sort and Wash the Beans

Refer to instructions for the stovetop cooking method for more details.

2. Cook the Beans

Add the beans to the Instant Pot inner pot. Add 8 cups water per pound of beans, and any aromatics you would like. Lock the lid and set the pressure valve to the sealing position. Cook on high pressure for 20 to 40 minutes depending on the type of bean. Here are the cooking times for common types of beans:

20-25 minutes: Black beans, black-eyed peas

25-30 minutes: Great Northern beans, navy beans, pinto beans

35-40 minutes: Cannellini beans, chickpeas/garbanzo beans

Allow the pressure to release naturally for about 30 minutes before releasing the remaining pressure. Drain and rinse the beans.

How to Cook Dried Bean in a Stovetop Pressure Cooker

Not an Instant Pot fan? That&aposs okay. A stovetop pressure cooker is an affordable option that also allows you to cook dried beans without soaking beforehand — although soaking won&apost hurt, and could even help the beans to remain intact better during the cooking process. Here&aposs how you do it:

1. Sort and Wash the Beans

Refer to instructions for the stovetop cooking method for more details.

2. Soak the Beans or Don&apost

If you do choose to soak your beans, refer to the instructions for the stovetop cooking method for more details.

3. Cook the Beans

Add 8 cups of water per pound of beans to the pressure cooker. Add any aromatics. Be sure to add oil! This prevents the steam vent from clogging. Secure the lid and turn the heat to high. Once it reaches high pressure, allow your beans to cook for 10 to 30  minutes (consult your manual for exact cooking times). When the time is up, allow the pressure to naturally release. Test for doneness periodically by either tasting or mashing against the side of the pot.

How Long Do Cooked Beans Last

Cooked beans are best stored in their cooking liquid and chilled in the fridge for up to 5 days. If you&aposve already drained all the beans prior to storing, toss them with a little oil, salt, and pepper, before storing.


Our Best Potato Recipes

Baked, roasted, mashed or fried — there's no wrong way to eat potatoes. From hearty meals to healthy sides, get creative with potatoes using these top-notch recipes.

Related To:

Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: Tara Donne ©FOOD NETWORK : 2012, Television Food Network, G.P.

Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: 0 ©2013, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Photo By: Matt Armendariz ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Garlic Roasted Potatoes

Hundreds of five-star reviews don&rsquot lie! Ina&rsquos roasted potatoes are a fan-favorite for good reason They come out perfectly crispy every time.

Instant Pot Mashed Potatoes

These super creamy mashed potatoes couldn't be any easier &mdash no dicing and no draining. This is a great make-ahead recipe any time of the year, but especially around the holidays, when you're trying to juggle multiple dishes.

Loaded Baked Potato Casserole

This casserole combines all the irresistible features of a loaded spud, but is cooked and served family style for an extra-hearty side.

Shepherd's Pie Potato Bowls

Don't be fooled. These aren't ordinary twice-baked potatoes: beneath the golden mashed potato top is a rich beef and vegetable filling. And unlike your casserole dish, the potato bowls are also edible.

Easy Caesar Potato Salad

Lemon, garlic and anchovies rule this creamy potato salad for a Caesar-inspired side dish.

Twice-Baked Potatoes

Filled with bacon bits, grated Cheddar and green onions, Ree&rsquos hearty potatoes are a real crowd-pleaser. Meal prep tip: After filling the potatoes, cover and let sit in the fridge. When you&rsquore ready to eat, pop &lsquoem in the oven for a quick side dish!

Best Breakfast Potatoes Ever

The name says it all. Ree tosses diced potatoes with onion and bell peppers, then seasons the veggies with salt, pepper and a kick of cayenne. The whole thing is roasted on a sheet pan for simple serving and even easier cleanup.

Potato Leek Soup

Robert&rsquos creamy soup is the perfect cold-weather dish. To make it extra filling, serve with crusty bread for dipping.

Melting Potatoes

Caramelized on the outside and creamy on the inside, these potatoes are utterly irresistible thanks to the infused flavors of garlic, herbs and chicken broth.

Loaded Potato Skin Dip

This dip tastes just like mashed potatoes &mdash topped with crispy bacon, garlic, Cheddar and scallions. Scoop it up with potato chips or veggies for a crowd-pleasing snack or app.

Crispiest Ever Potatoes

Somewhere between oven-roasted potatoes and crispy hash, these little creamer potatoes are boiled in water with baking soda before being smashed. The alkaline in the baking soda helps the skins crisp up quickly. Smashing increases their surface area and contact with the pan. The result is the crunchiest-ever crust.

Two-Potatoes Anna

Our twist on Potatoes Anna (thinly sliced potatoes cooked in lots of delicious butter). Use a mix of russet and sweet potatoes &mdash and add fresh, fragrant rosemary.

Fully Loaded Baked Potato Soup

In need of some comfort food? Guy describes his stick-to-your-ribs soup as a &ldquocross between fondue and a baked potato.&rdquo Serve it on a cold, chilly night for the ultimate hearty meal.

Oven-Fried Potatoes

This simple but tasty twist on French fries is so impressive, you won&rsquot miss the drive-through.

Salt Potatoes

Boiling your potatoes in super-salty water allows them to cook up extra creamy &ndash and it&rsquos the secret to the flavorful crust that forms on the outside.

Potato Rosti with a Smoked Salmon Rose

This is a lovely way to enjoy smoked salmon without the bagel. The crispy potato pancake is perfect for a special brunch.

Mashed Potatoes

Tyler&rsquos ultra-silky mashed potatoes are completely lump-free. His secret? Always starts the potatoes in cold water. That way, the temperature rises consistently, ensuring that every potato is cooked evenly and can be smoothly mashed.

Lemon-Parmesan Roasted Potatoes

Rethink roasted potatoes by upgrading this simple side dish with the bright, citrusy flavor of lemon and the savory taste of Parmesan cheese.

Potato Puffs

Looking for an alternative to your traditional potato side dish? Whip up a batch of these fluffy golden puffs. They&rsquore sure to become a family favorite.

Potato Bites

When you need an elegant appetizer fast, reach for baby red potatoes. Cooked tender and topped with creme fraiche and fresh herbs, they make the perfect pre-dinner bite.

Potato Salad

What&rsquos the key to Ina&rsquos potato salad? Tons of texture &ndash she combines soft potatoes, a creamy mayo sauce and crisp celery for a complex bite that&rsquos full of rich flavor.

Funeral Potatoes

Named for its comforting abilities, Ree&rsquos crowd-pleasing casserole is a traditional potluck offering. Shredded hash browns set up the base for the dish, which gets a salty crunch from a crushed potato chip topping.

Taco Potatoes

Taco night just got spud-tactular! A sprinkle of taco seasoning blend turns a simple oven-roasted side into something special.

Perfect Potatoes au Gratin

Ree&rsquos potatoes au gratin are what she calls a &ldquothrow-together dish.&rdquo She dices russet potatoes, then covers them with a simple cream sauce. Freshly grated Cheddar and green onions are all that&rsquos needed for an over-the-top finish to this creamy, dreamy side dish.

Potato Latkes

These classic potato pancakes are super crispy on the outside but soft and moist on the inside. This recipe calls for shredded potatoes for a traditional look, and a little bit of onion for that perfect hint of sweetness.

Garlic Yukon Gold Mashed Potatoes

It&rsquos amazing how just one clove of garlic really ups the flavor on classic mashed potatoes. For extra creaminess, make sure you use Yukon Gold potatoes, like the recipe calls for.

Four-Cheese Scalloped Potatoes

This showstopper of a side dish is not for the faint of heart. Heavy cream and four different types of cheese create the gooey, creamy sauce that defines the decadent treat.

The Baked Potato

The perfect baked potato is crunchy on the outside and light on the inside, and Alton&rsquos recipe guarantees just that. He bakes the potato directly on the oven rack, which makes for crispier skin.

German Potato Salad

Unlike American potato salad, German potato salad is made with a vinegar base. Always one for bold flavors, Bobby takes his to the next level by adding bacon, mustard and lots of green onions.

Slow-Cooker Home-Style Mashed Potatoes

The slow cooker takes an already-simple classic recipe and makes it even easier. Just toss the potatoes into a slow cooker, turn it on low and walk away for a few hours. When you return, the potatoes will be perfectly tender and ready to be mashed. Best of all, the slow cooker traps all the potato flavor, making these spuds extra potatoey.

Perfect Fried Potatoes

It&rsquos important that you don&rsquot crowd your Dutch oven when you&rsquore making this recipe. Fry your potatoes in two batches and your spuds will have enough space to cook up correctly &ndash with a nice, crispy crust!

Hasselback Potatoes

Ree stops slicing her russet potatoes just before the bottom, then brushes the whole thing with a butter-chive mixture. The end result is a luscious, crispy side dish that tastes just as good as it looks.

Gwen's Old-Fashioned Potato-Beef Casserole

Trisha&rsquos casserole recipe is passed down from her mom, and she says it&rsquos &ldquolike a cheeseburger on top of potatoes.&rdquo A breadcrumb topping is the cherry on top of this delightful comfort food.

Rissole Potatoes

Crispy on the outside and creamy on the inside &mdash what&rsquos not to love about these buttery little spuds?

Quick Ranch Potatoes

Save time and cleanup with the Instant Pot! This handy, all-in-one appliance will quickly cook your potatoes and keep them warm &mdash with just one dish to wash.

Potato Latkes

You only need four pantry staples (plus a little salt and black pepper) to make these savory, golden-brown fritters. The key is to make sure you squeeze as much liquid out of the grated potatoes as possible. That way, the latkes will be nice and crispy.


Waterbury Publications, Inc.

Despite the fact that they aren't the best foods to leave sitting out in the heat, pasta salad and egg salad are classic summer recipes. Spice things up by adding curry to your egg salad, and enjoy it tucked into a pita pocket with some fresh greens.

Get our recipe for Curried Egg Salad.


10. Tarte Tatin

According to culinary legend, tarte Tatin started life as a mistake. In 1898, hotelier Stephanie Tatin was making a traditional apple pie when she accidentally left the apples cooking in sugar and butter for too long. In a hurry to rescue the dessert, she put the pastry base on top of the burning fruit and put it in the oven. She supposedly served the upside-down tart to her guests at Hôtel Tatin and the result turned into the hotel’s signature dish. And we can still taste this excellent mistake today.

Make your own

  • Michelin-starred chef Raymond Blanc’s take on tarte tatin
  • Watch Jamie Oliver cook tarte tatin
  • A French-language recipe from the pages of Le Parisien

16 Delicious Recipes Featuring Beans & Lentils

Honestly, I can’t look at the title of this post without hearing my little brothers sing that silly song about beans. We didn’t grow up eating beans. The funny thing is, though, that after I stopped eating meat after college, I naturally started craving them. I quickly discovered that beans are hearty, satisfying, rich in protein and fiber, and gloriously inexpensive. Now that I’ve gotten on the bean bandwagon, my family has, too. Victory!

The United Nations has declared 2016 the International Year of Pulses (pulses are dried legumes like beans, chickpeas and lentils), so you’ll be hearing a lot more about beans over the coming months. I’ve teamed up with the USA Dry Pea and Lentil Council to bring you more recipes with pulses this year. Let’s kick it off with some of my favorite recipes!

Below, you’ll find a wide variety of hearty meals with Mexican, Mediterranean and Italian influences. These are all recipes that will help you meet those healthy New Years resolutions, and they just might change your family’s opinion on meatless meals, too.

For more information about the benefits of pulses and to join me in signing their Pulse Pledge (which is committing to eat one serving of pulses every week), visit PulsePledge.com.

1) Crispy Baked Falafel

“Another fabulous recipe! Loved everything, great flavor .. baked the falafel on a pan but am totally going to steal a friend’s cast iron next time to try that out. I think the dressing would also be lovely with other salads, or maybe lentils + some raw veggies. Thanks!” – Brittney

2) Lemony Lentil and Chickpea Salad with Radish and Herbs

Gluten free and easily vegan

“I LOVE this salad. I’ve been making it with dill only and serving with arugula. I make a batch and take to work for lunch. Got some family hooked on it too. It’s so fresh!” – Sarah

3) Lebanese Lemon-Parsley Bean Salad

“I do not often leave comments after making recipes I find online (I know … shame on me!!) but your Lebanese Lemon-Parsley Bean Salad was so successful that I had to thank you! The flavors were incredible – balanced, assertive, and addictive. It makes a lot so I shared (but only with people I really like). Every recipient called to demand the recipe. Great job and thank you for sharing! I will be returning often.” – Heather

4) Green Goddess Hummus

“My grocery store didn’t have tarragon so I used basil instead. Soooooo good! Thanks for the recipe.” – Nes

5) Socca Pizza with Summer Squash and Feta

“This was excellent and so easy! I’ve made it twice so far with different toppings. So good.” – Heather

6) Roasted Cauliflower and Lentil Tacos with Creamy Chipotle Sauce

Gluten-free option, vegan option

“Kate, I have to admit that when I first saw this I was bit scared to make it. Of course, based on how delicious your other recipes are, I should have known better. Well, no need to fear….this is soooo delicious. Another winner for sure, even my nonvegan family loved this.” – Tanya

7) Roasted Carrots with Farro, Chickpeas & Herbed Crème Fraîche

Gluten-free option, vegan option

“I made this with Christmas dinner and wow this was certainly my signature dish! It was scrumptious and so pretty. I was so intrigued by it, I had to make it and so glad I did!” – Leslie

8) Spiced Vegan Lentil Soup

“After eating your soup, I just told my husband that I will be making it all my life until I die or someone will need to cook it for me if I can’t. It’s simply the most amazing soup I was ever given the chance to enjoy. The flavour made me so happy. I strongly recommend this soup to anyone. Thank you so much Kate for sharing all of this goodness. Good vibs to you!” – Caroline

9) Spaghetti Squash Burrito Bowls

“Made this recipe for my brother’s birthday dinner and everyone loved it, including my 9 and 3 year old, who will eat any and every vegetable now, thanks to your blog. It’s amazing how kids can learn to appreciate all kinds of vegetables. Your recipes really help with that, I believe. Thanks, Kate!” – Lisa

10) Roasted Broccoli, Arugula and Lentil Salad

“Made this last night and it was amazing! I might omit the brussel sprouts and exclusively use broccoli (personal preference). Thanks for the great recipe!” – Stacey

11) Lentil and Mushroom Meatballs

Gluten-free option, vegan option

“Hi Kate! I have made these several times now and they are always great. One time i switched the mushrooms for beets and it was pretty tasty. This time I decided to try a different bean so I went with navy beans and instead of mushrooms I used fennel. It is delicious! Thank you so much for putting this stuff into the world.” – Sofia

12) Homemade Vegetarian Chili

“This is honestly the best veggie chili I’ve ever had! I made it today, and have plenty left to freeze for future yumminess. I didn’t blend any of it, just left it in its whole gorgeousness. Served it with some rice. Christmas day – who needs turkey!” – Liz

13) Kale, Black Bean and Avocado Burrito Bowl

“I’m not vegan but this is delicious. I used leftover beans and it turned out great. My aunt (who is vegan) has asked me make it two nights in a row. Thanks for the recipe it was the only one I found that I had all the ingredients in hand.” – Emma

14) Spicy Vegan Black Bean Soup

“This was wonderful! It has great flavor and I followed everything exactly as written. Used lime juice instead of vinegar. Yummy. ” – Pixie

15) Cowboy Caviar

“Hi, my name is Katie and I’m 10. I like the recipe a lot.” – Katie S. :)

16) Butternut Squash Chipotle Chili with Avocado

Gluten free (just be sure your tortillas are gluten free) and vegan

“WOW was this delicious! I just happened to come across it while looking for a butternut squash soup recipe. SO happy I made this instead. I fed it to meat eaters and vegetarians alike during a football party. I served it with a dollop of plain yogurt on top. Literally everyone asked me for the recipe Thanks for sharing – this is going in my favorite recipes file!” – Ellis

This post was created in partnership with the USA Dried Peas and Lentils Council. Opinions are my own, always. Thank you for supporting the sponsors who support C+K!