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Chinese Stir Fried Noodles recipe

Chinese Stir Fried Noodles recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Pasta
  • Pasta types
  • Noodles

A cheap, easy and tasty recipe using your favourite Chinese instant noodles. Try adding cooked, cubed pork or chicken, bean sprouts, water chestnuts or your favourite veg.

134 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 2 (90g) packets Chinese flavoured instant noodles
  • 3 eggs, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 4 spring onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 small carrot, peeled and grated
  • 75g green peas
  • 4 tablespoons red pepper, minced
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:25min ›Ready in:40min

  1. Boil noodles for 3 minutes, or until softened, without flavour packets. Reserve flavour packets. Drain noodles, and set aside.
  2. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a small frying pan. Scramble eggs in a bowl. Cook and stir in hot oil until firm. Set aside.
  3. In a separate frying pan, heat 1 teaspoon of oil over medium heat. Cook and stir spring onions in oil for 2 to 3 minutes, or until softened. Transfer to a separate dish, and set aside. Heat another teaspoon of cooking oil in the same frying pan. Cook and stir the the carrots, peas and peppers separately in the same manner, setting each aside when done.
  4. Combine 2 tablespoons sesame oil with 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil in a separate frying pan or wok. Fry noodles in oil for 3 to 5 minutes over medium heat, turning regularly. Sprinkle soy sauce, sesame oil and desired amount of reserved seasoning packets over noodles, and toss to coat. Add vegetables, and continue cooking, turning frequently, for another 5 minutes.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(185)

Reviews in English (143)

by Mrs. C

So good, but no need to take so many separate steps. Just cook the carrots and pepper first, push to the outsides of the pan and add meat. Boil noodles at the same time, then add to pot when meat is cooked. Add green onions and stir. Make a hole in the center and pour in the beaten eggs, scrambling as they cook. Stir it all together, add desired seasoning and you're done.-06 Jun 2007

by soaring now

This was really good. A lot like the stir fried noodles from the Chinese restaurant, but not as oily. I skipped the red pepper and added, instead, pea pods, bean sprouts,and water chestnuts. I also used 3 packages of noodles and only 1 packet of seasoning. The seasoning was just right. More than that would have been too salty. I don't know where they came up with it being 6 servings. It was just enough for me and my boyfriend and he's a big eater (and he would have like it if there had been more!) It serves probably more like 1 person per packet of noodles. Next time I'll use 4 packets and have leftovers! It was so yummy!-26 Sep 2005

by CRIMZZY

Everyone who was over for dinner loved the noodles along with my family, including a picky 4-year old and a baby! I did alter the recipe slightly: I cooked the veggies all at once as suggested by previous reviewers, and instead of using ramen noodles, I used "A taste of Thai" rice noodles according to package directions. They are a bit more filling and have no sodium, fat, or cholesterol. They went well with a grilled tenderloin, marinated and smothered in sweet and sour sauce.-17 Aug 2007


Singapore Stir-fried Noodles

I have to thank my friend, the late Ken Lo, the Chinese restaurateur, for introducing me to this incredibly good recipe, which is a spectacular combination of flavours, textures and colours.

If you can't get dried Chinese mushrooms or shrimps, use more of the fresh ones and it will still be wonderful.


Stir-Fried Chow Mein Noodles

Hong Kong may be known for its stunning metropolitan skyline. But it’s also known for its food. In this recipe, you’ll be preparing chow-mein noodles Hong Kong-style—pan-fried to crispy perfection, then topped with a mix of fresh, sautéed vegetables. Garnished with crunchy peanuts, mushrooms and the savory bite of Chinese chives, this quick dish delivers big, authentic flavors.

Title

Wash and dry the fresh produce. Roughly chop the Chinese broccoli. Roughly chop the peanuts. Peel and mince the garlic and ginger. Slice the chives into ½-inch pieces. Cut off and discard the stems of the mushrooms thinly slice the caps. To make the sauce, in a small bowl, combine the Chinese cooking sherry, cornstarch, ¼ cup of water and as much of the soy sauce as you&rsquod like, tasting as you go. (You may have extra soy sauce.)

In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 teaspoons of oil on medium until hot. Add the mushrooms and cook 3 to 5 minutes, or until browned and softened.

Add the garlic and ginger cook, stirring frequently, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until fragrant.

Add the Chinese broccoli cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 4 minutes, or until slightly softened. Transfer the cooked vegetables to a plate. Wipe out the pan.

Using your hands, gently separate the noodles. In the same pan used to cook the vegetables, heat a thin layer of oil on medium-high until hot. Add the noodles in a single, even layer. Cook, tossing occasionally to separate the noodles and coat them in oil, 5 to 7 minutes, or until browned and crispy.

Add the sauce and cook, stirring constantly, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until well combined.

Add the cooked vegetables and half of both the Chinese chives and peanuts to the pan of noodles. Cook, tossing occasionally, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until well combined. Remove from heat season with salt and pepper to taste.

Divide the noodles between 2 dishes. Garnish with the remaining Chinese chives and peanuts. Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

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Blue Apron delivers original, step-by-step recipes and fresh ingredients to customers nationwide. Our menus change every week, so with each delivery you learn to cook inventive new dishes with seasonal ingredients. By letting us source these hard-to-find ingredients for you, you'll get food that is fresher and cheaper than you can get at your local supermarket, and there's no waste because we only send you what you need for each recipe.

We named our company &ldquoBlue Apron&rdquo because chefs around the world wear blue aprons when they're learning to cook, and it has become a symbol of lifelong learning in cooking. We believe you're never done learning in the kitchen, so we design our menus to ensure you're always learning new cooking techniques, trying new cuisines, and using unique ingredients.

Blue Apron is a weekly subscription service with no commitment - you can skip a week or cancel at any time with a week's notice. We can't wait to cook with you!

Wash and dry the fresh produce. Roughly chop the Chinese broccoli. Roughly chop the peanuts. Peel and mince the garlic and ginger. Slice the chives into ½-inch pieces. Cut off and discard the stems of the mushrooms thinly slice the caps. To make the sauce, in a small bowl, combine the Chinese cooking sherry, cornstarch, ¼ cup of water and as much of the soy sauce as you&rsquod like, tasting as you go. (You may have extra soy sauce.)

In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 teaspoons of oil on medium until hot. Add the mushrooms and cook 3 to 5 minutes, or until browned and softened.

Add the garlic and ginger cook, stirring frequently, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until fragrant.

Add the Chinese broccoli cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 4 minutes, or until slightly softened. Transfer the cooked vegetables to a plate. Wipe out the pan.

Using your hands, gently separate the noodles. In the same pan used to cook the vegetables, heat a thin layer of oil on medium-high until hot. Add the noodles in a single, even layer. Cook, tossing occasionally to separate the noodles and coat them in oil, 5 to 7 minutes, or until browned and crispy.

Add the sauce and cook, stirring constantly, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until well combined.

Add the cooked vegetables and half of both the Chinese chives and peanuts to the pan of noodles. Cook, tossing occasionally, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until well combined. Remove from heat season with salt and pepper to taste.

Divide the noodles between 2 dishes. Garnish with the remaining Chinese chives and peanuts. Enjoy!


What are Shanghai Noodles?

Shanghai Pan Fried Noodles (Cu Chao Mian) is a Chinese stir-fried noodle dish typically made using thick and chewier Shanghai-style noodles. It is a staple in Shanghai and you can usually find it at most dumpling houses there.

The chewy texture pairs perfectly with the savory and delicious flavor from the soy sauce and meat.


Other Fried Noodle Recipes

Be sure to check out our other dim sum favorite noodle recipes, like Stir-fried Noodles w/ Chicken (Gai See Chow Mein) or Shrimp Chow Mein.

If you like a sweeter flavor to your noodles, try our more unique Honey Hoisin Stir Fried Noodles at home!

Finally, this recipe is vegetarian, but if you’re looking for a more veggie heavy pan-fried noodle dish, try our Vegetable Chow Mein.


Tips on Cooking the Noodles:

Our Guests Learn to Make Dumplings

Mr. David, Ms. Caroline, Ms. Alexandria & Ms. Elizabeth from USA had a great experience in a typical Xi'an family through a special cooking class by the host. With great curiosity about Chinese pastas, they learned to cook Chow Mein & Chinese dumplings at the same time. They commented it was a lot of fun and very insightful.

Our Guests in a Chinese Family

Ms. Julie, Mr. Ashley, Ms. Judith & Ms. Tamara from Australia had a wonderful time in a typical family in Xi'an under the arrangement of our company. In addition to a pleasant talk with the host, they also learned to cook Chow Mein & Shredded Pork with Garlic Sprouts from the hostess. They said it was a special experience for them.


Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoon light soy sauce, divided
  • 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper
  • 16 ounces Hong Kong-style (chow mein) noodles (see note)
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable, canola, or peanut oil, divided
  • 6 ounces five spiced tofu, julienned
  • 1 bunch (3 ounces) Chinese flowering chives, cut into 2-inch lenghts
  • 1 small carrot, cut into fine julienne
  • 8 ounces bean sprouts, trimmed
  • 3 scallions, cut into fine julienne

  • 1 (12 ounce) package fresh Chinese egg noodles
  • 1 (8 ounce) package bean sprouts
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 chicken breast half, cut into matchstick-sized strips (Optional)
  • 2 stalks celery, cut into matchsticks
  • 3 green onions, sliced into thin strips
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon XO sauce (Optional)
  • 4 ounces oyster mushrooms, cut into matchsticks
  • 3 tablespoons mushroom-infused soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • ½ cup unsalted chicken stock

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Cook noodles in boiling water, stirring occasionally, until noodles just start to soften, 3 to 5 minutes. Drain.

Fill a large bowl with ice and cold water. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add bean sprouts and cook, uncovered, until stems start to become translucent, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain in a colander and immediately immerse in the ice water for several minutes to stop the cooking process. Drain.

Heat oil in a wok over medium-high heat until starting to smoke. Add chicken, celery, green onions, garlic, and XO sauce. Stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook until slightly browned, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the cooked noodles, cooked bean sprouts, soy sauce, oyster sauce, and brown sugar. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes. Add chicken stock reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer until noodles are tender yet firm to the bite, 2 to 3 minutes. more.


Shanghai Fried Noodles

Shanghai fried noodles (上海, Shànghǎi Cūchǎo) are fried noodles flavored with sauce and garnished with pork and vegetables. They are from the Shanghai region of China where they also bear the name of cu chao mian.

Present in all the markets of northern China, these noodles are extremely popular, easy and quick to prepare and taste. This dish is also found in dumpling restaurants. The noodles used are cumian, that is to say thick noodles made from wheat flour and water. They are typical of northern China.

What is the origin of Shanghai fried noodles?

If the Shanghai fried noodles are from the city of Shanghai, they were also met with great success in Hong Kong and are an integral part of the culinary style of the region. These noodles are found in most Chinese restaurants around the world.

In Shanghai, these noodles are truly associated with street food and it was once quite rare to prepare them at home. Today they have become quite ubiquitous. Beginning in the 1950s, many Shanghai residents moved to Hong Kong and popularized this recipe.

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For many Shanghai residents, these noodles which bear their name are unknown to them and are, according to them, much more representative of the Hong Kong cuisine style, one of the styles of Chinese cuisine which has best exported throughout the world.

How to make Shanghai fried noodles

Cumian noodles can be made at home by mixing water and flour and working the dough until it is soft and smooth. The dough can then be spread, rolled out finely and cut or pulled until thick and regular noodles are obtained. Premade noodles are also very suitable, some are sold pre-cooked.

The rather lean pork should be cut into thin slices or strips and marinated in a mixture of light soy sauce and black soy sauce, shaoxing wine, an equivalent of yellow wine and sugar. Add cornstarch to the marinade which, when heated, will thicken the sauce. The meat should marinate like this for about 15 minutes.

The pork and the sauce are cooked in a very hot wok. Scallions and ginger are sautéed in the same wok with shiitake mushrooms.

For a vegetarian version, simply use these mushrooms and do without pork. The noodles are cooked in a wok. Soy sauce and sugar are added, and finally the pork. The noodles will take on a dark brown color when cooked in the sauce which will become thick and slightly sticky.

Finally, the preparation ends with the addition of green vegetables, usually choy sum or bok choy, varieties of small crunchy cabbage. The dish is eaten hot.

Variation: the noodles can also be cooked in simmering water, the noodles are cooked for five minutes then drained and immersed in ice water to firm them up and stop their cooking. They are again drained at the last moment and sautéed in the sauce. This step can be done in advance.

Variants

Noodles that are used for this dish are not always easy to find, but they can be replaced by Japanese noodles of the udon type whose shape and taste are similar to Shanghai noodles.

Pork can be replaced with beef or shrimp.

Sautéed noodles are very common in Asia. Each region has its own seasoning and style of noodles ranging from the thinnest to the thickest. Fresh noodles cook much faster than dry noodles and it is important to adjust the cooking time indicated because the cooking is done in a wok and not in boiling water.


Shrimp Lo Mein With Vegetables

jeffreyw / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

This shrimp lo mein with vegetables noodle dish is basically what the name says: shrimp and a colorful assortment of vegetables, including cabbage, bamboo shoots, and red bell pepper. The shrimp are first marinated in rice wine and cornstarch and then the dish is finished with a sauce made of ginger, oyster sauce, soy sauce, and broth.